The coronavirus has exposed a deep flaw to globalism

Countries have relied too much on importing products to keep prices low.

The coronavirus has exposed a deep flaw to globalism
The coronavirus has exposed a deep flaw to globalism

When you walk outdoors in China, people are required to wear face masks. They cannot leave their apartment complexes without them. Meanwhile, China is the world’s leading manufacturer and the Central Government assigned many factories to produce mass quantities of the product line.

Nevertheless, China’s quarantine measures and lockdown have impacted the production of face masks to be exported overseas. Many shipping ports were partially shut down.

Accordingly, US public health officials and the White House Coronavirus Task Force have all urged Americans to refrain from purchasing face masks so that sufficient supplies of the product would be made available to all healthcare workers in the country.

But why did local manufacturers and sovereign governments not prepare better for the imminent spread of the COVID-19 outbreak in their nations? Many countries had one to two months to prepare for the epidemic.

Sovereign governments could have alerted domestic manufacturers to shift production lines in order to make more face masks, antiseptics, medical devices and equipment to test and treat patients. They should have known better than Chinese exporters were struggling.

Upon hearing the news, manufacturers should have responded by mass-producing face masks, but they waited too long. What were they thinking? The same can be said for India, the United Kingdom and the European Union.

Hence, the coronavirus has exposed a deep flaw to globalism. Countries have relied too much on importing products to keep prices low, but if Chinese manufacturers get hard hit by an epidemic how could other nations recover from it?

All strong and powerful countries have to develop their respective manufacturing sectors, just in case emergency situations do arise. The coronavirus will be a teaching lesson for all sovereign governments.

They must ensure stable domestic supply chains and to maintain sufficient supplies of food and necessities for their domestic markets.